Altarboy9 (ashblue) wrote in inuktitut,
Altarboy9
ashblue
inuktitut

First post...

It seems there's not a lot of action here... i've been watching for awhile. it's true inuktitut data is not easy to find... lately i've been lucky as i chose to study and work on it for my syntactic typology class. so i may be posting here over the next while...


Inuktitut:qai-vuq
English:come-he

Inuktitut:qai-saali-vuq
English:come-soon-he

Inuktitut:qai-saali-niar-tuq
English:come-soon-will-he

Inuktitut:qai-saali-nia-qquur-tuq
English:come-soon-will-probably-he

Inuktitut:qai-saali-nia-qquu-nngit-tuq
English:come-soon-will-probably-not-he

Inuktitut:qai-saali-nia-qquu-nngi-kkaluar-puq
English:come-soon-will-probably-not-it is true-he


The '-' between morpheme boundarys in inuktitut are not noticable in their spoken language and are only here to show how the words are seperated in meaning. but for the sake of pronounciation and meaning all these words are actually one word meaning the rough english translation to the right. I have had major problems trying to figure out an easy way to explain this even to those in my Syntactic Typology class where we are studying a wide variety of langauges. Yesterday when I was dozing off, I came up with something I think might work... The issue here is that 'we' speakers of english, and even other 'non-poly-synthetic' languages can not help but feel instinctivly that this inuktituk word... is actually a series of words. here is where the solution is. take the word orange (as in the fruit). now imagine that there is a linguistic-family, which thinks it odd that we call it orange, when clearly there are so many other features which are involved in its description. what if for them it translates into +fruit +round +orange coloured... and is in essence a cumulation of features, which we have clumped together into what is for us one word, yet containing all the semantic meaning of their entire description.
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