Scott, aka Frodo, aka Scooby, aka Ketchup (aberwak) wrote in inuktitut,
Scott, aka Frodo, aka Scooby, aka Ketchup
aberwak
inuktitut

Message in Iñupiaq

In my Livejournal, I recently posted (just for the fun of it) a message that was written in English and Iñupiaq. Although Iñupiaq (spoken in northern Alaska) is slightly different from Inuktitut, the languages are still very similar. The message isn't much... but just thought I'd see what everyone here thinks (and the grammar or vocabulary is almost certainly not accurate, as it's been a while since I've studied the language):

"Uvlupak, aglaŋñiaŋtuŋa LiveJournal-mi Iñupiatunlu tannitunlu (atakii alianaitchuqlu siġļiŋnaqtuqlu). Piyumisuuruŋa piuŋiļaq, aglaan uvlupak aliannaqtuŋa. Siļagiktuq - qannikumautuq qiiyanaqtuq. Apun nakauġiruŋa. Qannikuuŋitchuq natiġnaaġmi New Mexico-mi, aglaan iġġimi qannikuutuq. Aaqagu, maniruŋa iluqasi qiñigaaq qannikun.

Today, I will write in my LiveJournal in both English and Iñupiaq (because it's both fun and challenging). Usually I do nothing, but today I am bored. The weather is nice - it might snow if it gets cold. I like the snow. It rarely snows in the valleys of New Mexico, but it usually does snow in the mountains. Later, I'll show you all a picture of the snow falling."
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  • 8 comments
Interesting :)

Just out of curiousity, where did you learn the language?
I attended the University of Alaska, Fairbanks last year as part of an exchange program. They had a class on the Iñupiaq language, so I decided it'd be fun to take. I even was able to try some native food. There's nothing like good maktaq (whale skin and blubber). ;-P
Wow, that's kickass! Maybe I'll check it out someday :)
i'm looking for a vocubulary of Alaskan Inuits. google is of no help. i'd be exceedingly grateful to you if you could assit me somehow.
The two best sources I've found for Inupiaq vocabulary would be the Inupiaq Online Dictionary at the Alaskool website and Iñupiallu Tanngillu Uqalungisa Ilangich (Abridged Iñupiaq and English Dictionary), by Edna MacLean- available through the Alaska Native Language Center (just go into their publications section).

Also, I just wanted to point out that you don't need to add the "s" to "Inuit," since the word "Inuit" is already plural. In the Northern Alaskan Inuit language (Iñupiaq), iñuk is single for person (it's "inuk" in the eastern Inuit languages), iññuk for dual, and inuit for three or more people- I believe. I'm not entirely sure on that, though. "Inuit," is the plural meaning "people."
thank you very much
i should have appologised for my russian english beforehand)

Anonymous

November 1 2010, 17:01:55 UTC 6 years ago

Perfect description of Inuk (singular), iññuk for (dual) and inuit (3+).


Here's my version from Canada:

"Ublukut, titiaŋñiaŋtuŋa LiveJournal-mi Iñuktulu Kablunaatulu. (ataukaa alianaitchuqmat pijariatumalu). Ublumi suluanginama. Siļatauyuq - qanniruminaqtuq Ikiinaqsiniqpat.Apun kajarijara.Qannirauuŋitchuq natiġnaaġmi New Mexico-mi,kisiani qannikpatuq qaiktumi. Aaqagu, adjimik (image) qaniktilugu takutiniapagit.

Today, I will write in my LiveJournal in both English and Iñupiaq (because it's both fun and challenging). Usually I do nothing, but today I am bored. The weather is nice - it might snow if it gets cold. I like the snow. It rarely snows in the valleys of New Mexico, but it usually does snow in the mountains. Later, I'll show you all a picture of the snow falling."